Print journal: Time to remove your wisdom teeth!?

By: Michelle Tran, writing for The Science in Society Review Evolutionists postulate that the diets of our more primitive ancestors were largely based on hard grains, seeds, and other forms of vegetation. As such, early humans were adapted to their lifestyle, sporting larger jaws and more teeth to aid in grinding down tougher vegetation. However, the advent of cooked foods was …

Print journal: Why We Should Be Skeptical of the Science of Sexuality

By: Hannah LeBlanc, writing for The Science in Society Review In the past decade or so, several efforts to uncover the science of homosexuality have been published and received great media attention. From reports of “gay” animals to searches for the “gay gene” to the differences between “gay” and “straight” brains, there have been many reports in the popular media about …

Print journal: Potential of Viruses in Medical Treatments

By: Elizabeth Richardson, writing for The Science in Society Review Viruses present persistent dangers to human health and they have caused many of the most terrifying and lethal diseases throughout history, from smallpox to influenza and HIV. There is no antibiotic equivalent for the virus: the only weapons we have against the spread of viral disease are vaccinations and drugs that …

Print journal: Evolutionary Enquiry into the Structure of Perception

By: Taylor Coplen, writing for The Science in Society Review Humans are terrible observers.  If a laboratory instrument introduced as much bias as we do, it would be tossed out immediately. We fabricate significant patterns from meaningless data. We see faces everywhere, from pieces of toast to Mars[1]. And every classic rock song, when played backwards, seems to reveal some hidden, …

Print journal: The Resilience of the Internet

By: Wing Chan, writing for The Science in Society Review The new year was welcomed with fireworks, celebrations and a striking unconventional public protest: a virtual demonstration. A massive demonstration without a physical presence, but instead with crowds of websites, most notably Wikipedia, Wired and Google US, restricting their content as an illustration of what might happen should the US Government’s …

Print journal: Optogenetics as a medical treatment—and a barrier to metaphysics

By: Aleksandra Augustynowicz, writing for The Science in Society Review Imagine a healing pinpoint of light, fixed in the center of your forehead, radiating beams of energy throughout your body—a snippet from your local meditation class, or a clairvoyant glimpse of the future. About 121 million people worldwide suffer from depression, and in 2000, the illness was 4th in the global …